Noticed changes in youth attitudes? Concerned about sexualised behaviour amongst children? Constantly picking up the pieces of dealing with sexting in schools?

Thousands upon thousands of schools around the globe are struggling to make sense of the alarming rise in sexualised behaviours and knowing how to respond. Wherever you are in the world, we're here to help you gain the confidence to talk about porn and find tools to support children and young people's safety and mental health.

Why do children need safeguarding from pornography?

KIDS ARE VIEWING PORN EARLIER THAN EVER BEFORE

14%
OF BOYS FIRST VIEWED PORN BY AGE 12 IN 2008
49%
OF BOYS FIRST VIEWED PORN BY AGE 12 IN 2014
65%
OF BOYS FIRST VIEWED PORN BY AGE 12 IN 2019

How concerned are parents?

According to a cross-national survey of parents in Australia, New Zealand and the UK, two of the top three online situations parents are most concerned about are related to sexual themes.

Sharing nude images or video of themselves with other people

% of parents concerned

Being treated in a hurtful or nasty way on the internet

% of parents concerned

Seeing sexual images or video of someone naked

% of parents concerned

learn about the issues that children and young people need support with

Pornography

Online exposure is increasing

Kids exposure to pornography and to child sexual abuse is on the rise due to its proliferating presence on the internet. (Ey & McInnes, 2017)
Research Link

Sexual Harassment and Violence in Schools is rife

hypersexualised environments put teens under pressure

Young people report being under ‘massive pressure’ to have sex and behave in a sexualised way from 12 and sometimes younger.

A UK investigation into sexual harassment and violence in schools found that sexualised behaviour is the new social norm in young people’s daily lives and adults and institutions need to ‘face up to it’.

Research Link

Young women in Australia

say that online abuse and harassment are endemic

Australian girls and young women aged 15–19 say that education should extend to the critique and discussion of how violent and degrading pornography is negatively impacting on young Australians’ relationships and boys’ and young men’s attitudes towards sex in general.

“[Schools should] introduce [discussion of] pornography as part of the
education as young boys are accessing it and thinking this is normal in
relationships.” – Young woman, aged 15 years

Research Link

Problematic sexual behaviours

Observed in schools

40.8% of educators have observed children physically acting out sexually with other children, sexually harassing other children, verbally attempting to coerce other children to participate in sexual behavior, and individual displays of sexual behavior. At times, these behaviours may be due to the influence of pornography. (Ey & McInnes, 2017)

Research Link

Viewing pornography

Can be distressing

Researcher, Dr. Michael Flood, (2009) indicates that premature or inadvertent exposure to sexually explicit content may be disturbing or upsetting for younger children, and contributes to sexist and unhealthy notions of sex and relationships.
Research Link

Pornography

A “how to” manual

Leading Australian practitioner, Russell Pratt says:
“One thing seems clear: pornography provides a “how to” manual, showing every possible angle of what goes where and who can do what to whom, as well as providing sexual stimulation and shaping patterns of sexual arousal.”

Research Link

Liz Walker of Youth Wellbeing Project has been featured on ...

Looking for more?

MORE IQ UNITS ARE ON THE WAY

© Youth Wellbeing Project 2020